A multiscale, biophysical model of flow-induced red blood cell damage

Authors

  • Flavia Vitale,

    1. Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Rice University, Houston, TX
    2. Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Materials and Environment, University of Rome “La Sapienza”, Rome, Italy
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  • Jaewook Nam,

    1. Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Rice University, Houston, TX
    2. School of Chemical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Korea, Korea
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  • Luca Turchetti,

    1. Faculty of Engineering, Università Campus Bio-Medico di Roma, Rome, Italy
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  • Marek Behr,

    1. Chair for Computational Analysis of Technical Systems (CATS), Center for Computational Engineering Science (CCES), RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany
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  • Robert Raphael,

    1. Dept. of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, TX
    2. Ken Kennedy Institute for Information Technology, Rice University, Houston, TX
    3. The Smalley Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Rice University, Houston, TX
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  • Maria Cristina Annesini,

    1. Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Materials and Environment, University of Rome “La Sapienza”, Rome, Italy
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  • Matteo Pasquali

    Corresponding author
    1. Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Rice University, Houston, TX
    2. Ken Kennedy Institute for Information Technology, Rice University, Houston, TX
    3. The Smalley Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Rice University, Houston, TX
    4. Dept. of Chemistry, Dept. of Materials Science and NanoEngineering, Rice University, Houston, TX
    • Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to M. Pasquali at mp@rice.edu.

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Abstract

A new model for mechanically induced red blood cell damage is presented. Incorporating biophysical insight at multiple length scales, the model couples flow-induced deformation of the cell membrane (∼10 µm) to membrane permeabilization and hemoglobin transport (∼100 nm). We estimate hemolysis in macroscopic (above ∼1 mm) 2-D inhomogeneous blood flow by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and compare results with literature models. Simulations predict the effects of local flow field on RBC damage, due to the combined contribution of membrane permeabilization and hemoglobin transport. The multiscale approach developed here lays a foundation for a predictive tool for the optimization of hydrodynamic and hematologic design of cardiovascular prostheses and blood purification devices. © 2014 American Institute of Chemical Engineers AIChE J, 60: 1509–1516, 2014

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