A dual mechanism for low-stress hemolysis in laminar blood flow

Authors

  • R. L. Beissinger,

    Corresponding author
    1. Chemical Engineering Department, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720
    Current affiliation:
    1. Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering at Illinois, Institute of Technology, Chicago
    • Chemical Engineering Department, University of California, Berkeley Berkeley, CA 94720
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  • M. C. Williams

    Corresponding author
    1. Chemical Engineering Department, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720
    • Chemical Engineering Department, University of California, Berkeley Berkeley, CA 94720
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Abstract

Human blood is sheared in cone-and-plate and parallel-plate rotational viscometers, the latter with variable plate spacings h. Plasma is analyzed for hemoglobin and LDH content before and after shearing to determine the extent of shear-induced blood damage within the low-stress regime (stress ⩽ 13 Pa). Geometrical variations in the test apparatus can be accommodated by correlating blood damage with the radially-averaged shear rate. Data on expired blood are shown to imply that much of the damage arises in the bulk fluid, with a smaller contribution from surface effects. Models are proposed to explain these results, obtained over a shear rate range to 5,000 s−1; parallel-plate platen separation is 0.25 < h < 1.00 mm, cone-and-plate angle is 0.5°, and both systems have platens 100 mm in diameter.

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