Novel monolithic stirred reactor

Authors

  • Rolf K. Edvinsson Albers,

    1. Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Julianalaan 136, 2628 BL Delft, The Netherlands
    Current affiliation:
    1. Bleaching Chemicals Div., Eka Chemicals AB, SE-445 80 Bonus, Sweden
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  • Marco J. J. Houterman,

    1. Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Julianalaan 136, 2628 BL Delft, The Netherlands
    Current affiliation:
    1. Shell Chemicals, P.O. Box 6060, 4780 LN Moerdijk. The Netherlands
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  • Theo Vergunst,

    1. Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Julianalaan 136, 2628 BL Delft, The Netherlands
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  • Eric Grolman,

    1. Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Julianalaan 136, 2628 BL Delft, The Netherlands
    Current affiliation:
    1. DSM Research, P.O. Box 18, 6160 MD Geleen, The Netherlands
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  • Jacob A. Moulijn

    Corresponding author
    1. Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Julianalaan 136, 2628 BL Delft, The Netherlands
    • Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Julianalaan 136, 2628 BL Delft, The Netherlands
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Abstract

A novel reactor configuration in which blocks of monoliths are arranged in a stirrer-like configuration was studied. A substantial liquid flow rate can be realized through the monolith blades at relatively low power input, owing to the high permeability of the monolithic structure. The inside of the monolithic channels can be coated with a thin layer of either a conventional catalyst or a biocatalyst, thereby eliminating many of the problems associated with using a suspended catalyst. The basic relationship among stirrer speed, geometry, liquid viscosity, and the resulting torque and flow through the blades were studied. Furthermore, the fast decomposition of a dilute, aqueous hydrogen peroxide solution was used to characterize the rate of external mass transfer.

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