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Comparison of body fat estimates using 3D digital laser scans, direct manual anthropometry, and DXA in men§

Authors

  • Todd N. Garlie,

    Corresponding author
    1. Warfighter Science, Technology and Applied Research (WarSTAR) United States Army Natick Soldier Research Development and Engineering Center (NSRDEC), Natick, Massachusetts 01760
    • Ergonomics Group, Warfighter Science Technology and Applied Research (WarSTAR) Directorate, Natick Solider Research, Development and Engineering Center (NSRDEC), 45 Kansas Street, Natick, Massachusetts
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  • John P. Obusek,

    1. Warfighter Science, Technology and Applied Research (WarSTAR) United States Army Natick Soldier Research Development and Engineering Center (NSRDEC), Natick, Massachusetts 01760
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  • Brian D. Corner,

    1. Warfighter Science, Technology and Applied Research (WarSTAR) United States Army Natick Soldier Research Development and Engineering Center (NSRDEC), Natick, Massachusetts 01760
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  • Edward J. Zambraski

    1. Military Performance Division, United States Army Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick Soldier Systems Center (NSSC), Natick, Massachusetts 01760
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  • The findings contained in this paper are not to be construed as an official Department of the Army position unless so designated by other authorized documents.

  • Citation of trade names in this report does not constitute an official endorsement or approval of the use of such items.

  • §

    The investigators have adhered to the policies for protection of human subjects as prescribed in Army Regulation 70-25, and the research was conducted in adherence with the provisions of 45 CFR Part 46.

  • This article is a US Government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

Abstract

Objectives:

The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of utilizing three dimensional whole body laser surface scanning (3DS) to obtain specific anthropometric measurements to estimate percent body fat (BF).

Methods:

Percent BF estimates from 37 male volunteers, of age 18–62 yr, were determined by inputting manual anthropometric (MA) and 3DS anthropometric measurements into the current Army BF prediction equation for males. The results were compared with each other and to BF values from Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA), employed as a reference method.

Results:

Mean percent BF estimates (±SD) derived from MA, 3DS and from DXA were 18.4(±3.8), 18.8(±3.9), and 18.9(±4.7), respectively. Analysis of Variance tests revealed no statistical difference between the mean values. Correlation analysis comparing MA and 3DS derived percent BF estimates to each other and to those measured by DXA revealed moderate to strong Pearson correlation coefficients (r), small to moderate standard errors of the estimate (SEE), and were statistically significant (p < 0.05).

Conclusions:

Correlation coefficients and SEE results for this sample were: (1) DXA vs 3DS; r = 0.74, SEE = 3.2, (2) MA vs DXA; r = 0.82, SEE = 2.8, and (3) MA vs 3DS; r = 0.96, SEE = 1.0. Lin's concordance analysis, including Bland-Altman limits of agreement (LOA), revealed statistically significant measurement agreement among the three measurement modalities (p < 0.05). The application of 3DS scanning to estimate percent BF from commonly used anthropometric measurements are in close agreement with BF estimates derived from analogous MA measurements and from DXA scanning. Am. J. Hum. Biol. 22:695-701, 2010. Published 2010Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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