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Keywords:

  • occupation;
  • industry;
  • Parkinson's disease;
  • occupational coding;
  • service occupations;
  • agriculture occupations

Abstract

Background

The etiology of Parkinson's disease (PD) is considered to have a strong environmental component, but relatively few studies have investigated the potential association between occupation and the disease.

Methods

In a population-based case-control study, we collected comprehensive occupational histories from all study participants, 144 case and 464 control subjects.

Results

Chi-square analysis revealed that working in an agricultural occupation increased estimated PD risk (OR = 1.74; 95% CI = 0.85, 3.60). In contrast, a history of ever working in a service occupation was negatively associated with PD risk (OR = 0.69; 95% CI = 0.47, 1.00). Risk estimates were close to one for specific service occupations. Adjusted odds ratios for all non-service occupational and industrial categories were similar, and working in a service occupation was the only significant inverse predictor of PD risk.

Conclusions

Future investigations focusing on lifestyle factors and environmental exposures within the agricultural and service occupational categories are warranted. Am. J. Ind. Med. 39:564–571, 2001. © 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.