On the job illness and injury resulting in lost work time among a national cohort of emergency medical services professionals

Authors


Abstract

Background

The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence and incidence of job-related illness or injury resulting in lost work time among a national cohort of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) professionals. Also, it was hypothesized that individual and work life characteristics were associated with the occurrence of illnesses or injury.

Methods

Data for this analysis were obtained from the Longitudinal Emergency Medical Technician Attributes and Demographics Study (LEADS), a prospective study of EMS professionals. The outcome variable of interest was self-reported absence from their EMS job due to an EMS work related illness or injury. The prevalence and incidence of injury with lost work time was estimated using cross-sectional and follow-up data. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to determine if individual and work life characteristics were associated with occupational injury.

Results

The prevalence of job-related illness or injury with time away from work was estimated at 9.4%, while the 1-year incidence was estimated at 8.1 per 100 EMS providers. The results from the logistic regression model fit to follow-up data indicate that increasing call volume (OR = 3.12 for very high vs. moderate, 95% CI 1.40–6.97), an urban work environment (OR = 2.79, 95% CI 1.65–4.72) and a history of back problems (OR = 1.72, 95% CI 1.06–2.78) were associated with reporting job-related illness or injury.

Conclusions

Results from this analysis provide estimates of the prevalence and incidence of on the job illness and injury resulting in lost work time among a national cohort of EMS professionals. Am. J. Ind. Med. 50:921–931, 2007. © 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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