Risks associated with tendinitis: effects from demographic, socioeconomic, and psychological status among Brazilian workers

Authors

  • Paulo Frazão PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Public Health Postgraduate Program, Catholic University of Santos, Santos, Brazil
    • Programa de Pós-Graduação em Saúde Coletiva, Universidade Católica de Santos, Rua Carvalho de Mendonça, 144, 4° andar, Vila Mathias, Santos, SP CEP 11070-906, Brazil.
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  • Carla Maria Costa Msc,

    1. Public Health Postgraduate Program, Catholic University of Santos, Santos, Brazil
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  • Márcia Furquim de Almeida PhD

    1. Epidemiology Department, Sao Paulo University, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil
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Abstract

Background

Self-reported tendinitis/tenosynovitis was evaluated by gender, age group, skin color, family income, and educational and psychological status.

Methods

!The study was carried out in a representative sample of formally contracted Brazilian workers from a household survey. A total of 54,660 participants were included. Occupations were stratified according to estimated prevalences of self-reported injuries. Non-conditional logistic regression was performed, and all variables were analyzed in two occupational groups.

Results

The overall prevalence rate of tendinitis/tenosynovitis was 3.1%: 5.5% in high-prevalence occupations (n = 10,726); and 2.5% in low-prevalence occupations (n = 43,934). White female workers between the ages of 45 and 64 years and at a higher socioeconomic level were more likely to report tendinitis/tenosynovitis regardless of their occupational category. An adjusted OR = 3.59 [95% CI: 3.15--4.09] was found between tendinitis/tenosynovitis and psychological status.

Conclusion

Among formally contracted Brazilian workers, higher income can imply greater physical and psychological demands that, regardless of occupational stratum, increase the risk of tendinitis/tenosynovitis. Am. J. Ind. Med. 53:72–79, 2010. © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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