Disparities by ethnicity, language, and immigrant status in occupational health experiences among Las Vegas hotel room cleaners

Authors

  • Stéphanie Premji PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Medicine, University of California at San Francisco, Richmond, California
    • Postdoctoral Fellow, University of California at San Francisco, UC Berkeley Richmond Field Station, 1301 South 46th Street, Building 163, Richmond, CA 94804.
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  • Niklas Krause MD, PhD, MPH

    1. Department of Medicine, University of California at San Francisco, Richmond, California
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    • Associate professor.


Abstract

Objective

We examined disparities in workers' occupational health experiences.

Methods

We surveyed 941 unionized Las Vegas hotel room cleaners about their experiences with work-related pain and with employers, physicians, and workers' compensation. Data were analyzed for all workers and by ethnicity, language, and immigrant status.

Results

Hispanic and English as second language (ESL) workers were more likely than their counterparts to report work-related pain and, along with immigrant workers, to miss work because of this pain. Hispanic, ESL, and immigrant workers were not consistently at a disadvantage with regard to their own responses to work-related pain but were so with respect to reported responses by workers' compensation, physicians, and employers.

Conclusions

There are indications of disparities in occupational health experiences within this job title. The use of different group classifications, while implying different mechanisms, produced similar results. Am. J. Ind. Med. 53:960–975, 2010. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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