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Association between psychosocial factors and musculoskeletal symptoms among Iranian nurses

Authors

  • Ramin Mehrdad MD, MPH,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Occupational Medicine, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
    2. Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts
    • Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard School of Public Health, 655 Huntington Ave., Building 1, Room 1210, Boston, MA 02115-6021.
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    • Associate Professor of Occupational Medicine.

    • Research Fellow.

  • Jack T. Dennerlein PhD,

    1. Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts
    2. Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
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    • Associate Professor of Ergonomics and Safety.

    • Associate Professor of Orthopaedics.

  • Mohammad Haghighat MD,

    1. Department of Occupational Medicine, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
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    • Occupational Medicine Specialist.

  • Omid Aminian MD

    1. Department of Occupational Medicine, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
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    • Associate Professor of Occupational Medicine.


Abstract

Background

While psychosocial factors have been associated with musculoskeletal symptoms among nurses in some countries, previous studies of Iranian nurses show little association using a demand and control questionnaire. The aim of this study is to assess and evaluate the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms and to assess their relationships with psychosocial factors among nurses in Iran.

Methods

In a cross-sectional study, 347 hospital nurses completed a self-reported questionnaire containing the Standardized Nordic questionnaire for musculoskeletal symptoms and the General Nordic questionnaire for Psychological and Social factors at work (QPS Nordic 34+ Questionnaire).

Results

Prevalence of low back pain, knee pain, shoulder pain, and neck pain were 73.2%, 68.7%, 48.6%, and 46.3%, respectively. Middle and high stress groups had higher crude and adjusted odds than the low stress group for all body sites. The association for neck, wrist/hand, and upper back and ankle/foot reports (adjusted odds ratio for high stress ranging from 2.4 to 3.0) were statistically significant.

Conclusions

We observed a high prevalence of self-reported musculoskeletal symptoms at a number of body sites, which were associated with psychosocial factors and specifically stress as defined by the QPS Nordic 34+ Questionnaire. Am. J. Ind. Med. 53:1032–1039, 2010. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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