Breast cancer risk by occupation and industry: Analysis of the CECILE study, a population-based case–control study in France

Authors

  • Sara Villeneuve MSc,

    1. Inserm (National Institute of Health and Medical Research), CESP (Center for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health), U1018, Environmental Epidemiology of Cancer, Villejuif, France
    2. University Paris-Sud, UMRS 1018, Villejuif, France
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  • Joëlle Févotte Dipl.-Ing.,

    1. Department of Occupational Health, InVS Institut de Veille Sanitaire, Saint-Maurice, France
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  • Antoinette Anger MSc,

    1. Inserm (National Institute of Health and Medical Research), CESP (Center for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health), U1018, Environmental Epidemiology of Cancer, Villejuif, France
    2. University Paris-Sud, UMRS 1018, Villejuif, France
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  • Thérèse Truong PhD,

    1. Inserm (National Institute of Health and Medical Research), CESP (Center for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health), U1018, Environmental Epidemiology of Cancer, Villejuif, France
    2. University Paris-Sud, UMRS 1018, Villejuif, France
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  • Farida Lamkarkach MSc,

    1. Inserm (National Institute of Health and Medical Research), CESP (Center for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health), U1018, Environmental Epidemiology of Cancer, Villejuif, France
    2. University Paris-Sud, UMRS 1018, Villejuif, France
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  • Oumar Gaye MSc,

    1. Inserm (National Institute of Health and Medical Research), CESP (Center for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health), U1018, Environmental Epidemiology of Cancer, Villejuif, France
    2. University Paris-Sud, UMRS 1018, Villejuif, France
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  • Pierre Kerbrat MD,

    1. Centre Eugène Marquis, Rennes, France
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  • Patrick Arveux MD,

    1. Department of Medical Information, Centre Georges-François Leclerc, Dijon, France
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  • Laurent Miglianico MD,

    1. Centre Hospitalier Privé Saint-Grégoire, Saint-Grégoire, France
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  • Ellen Imbernon MD,

    1. Department of Occupational Health, InVS Institut de Veille Sanitaire, Saint-Maurice, France
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  • Pascal Guénel MD, PhD

    Corresponding author
    1. Inserm (National Institute of Health and Medical Research), CESP (Center for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health), U1018, Environmental Epidemiology of Cancer, Villejuif, France
    2. University Paris-Sud, UMRS 1018, Villejuif, France
    3. Department of Occupational Health, InVS Institut de Veille Sanitaire, Saint-Maurice, France
    • Inserm UMRS 1018, 16 avenue Paul Vaillant-Couturier, 94807 Villejuif cedex, France
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Abstract

Background

It has been suggested that certain occupational exposures may play a role in breast cancer etiology. The recognition of high-risk occupations may give clues about potential mammary carcinogens in the work place.

Methods

We conducted a population-based case–control study in France including 1,230 breast cancer cases and 1,315 population controls with detailed information on lifetime work history. Odds ratios for women ever employed in an occupation or industry were adjusted for well-established risk factors for breast cancer.

Results

Adjusted odds ratios were marginally increased in some white-collar occupations, as well as in textile workers (2.4; 95% CI [0.9–6.0]), rubber and plastics product makers (1.8; 95% CI [0.9–3.5]), and in women employed for more than 10 years as nurses (1.4; 95% CI [0.9–2.1]) and as tailors/dressmakers (1.5; 95% CI [0.9–2.6]). The incidence of breast cancer was increased among women employed in the manufacture of chemicals, of non-metallic mineral products, and decreased among women in agriculture.

Conclusions

These findings suggest a possible role of occupational exposures in breast cancer, including night-shift work, solvents and endocrine disrupting chemicals and require further studies with detailed assessment of occupational exposures. Am. J. Ind. Med. 54:499–509, 2011. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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