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Implementation and adoption of mechanical patient lift equipment in the hospital setting: The importance of organizational and cultural factors

Authors

  • Ashley L. Schoenfisch MSPH,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Community and Family Medicine, Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina
    • Department of Community and Family Medicine, Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, 2200 West Main Street, Suite 400, Durham, NC 27705.
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  • Douglas J. Myers ScD,

    1. Department of Community and Family Medicine, Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina
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  • Lisa A. Pompeii PhD,

    1. Division of Epidemiology, Human Genetics & Environmental Sciences, University of Texas, Houston, Texas
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  • Hester J. Lipscomb PhD

    1. Department of Community and Family Medicine, Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina
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  • Disclosure Statement: The authors report no conflicts of interest.

Abstract

Background

Work focused on understanding implementation and adoption of interventions designed to prevent patient-handling injuries in the hospital setting is lacking in the injury literature and may be more insightful than more traditional evaluation measures.

Methods

Data from focus groups with health care workers were used to describe barriers and promoters of the adoption of patient lift equipment and a shift to a “minimal-manual lift environment” at two affiliated hospitals.

Results

Several factors influencing the adoption of the lift equipment and patient-handling policy were noted: time, knowledge/ability, staffing, patient characteristics, and organizational and cultural aspects of work. The adoption process was complex, and considerable variability by hospital and across units was observed.

Conclusions

The use of qualitative data can enhance the understanding of factors that influence implementation and adoption of interventions designed to prevent patient-handling injuries among health care workers. Am. J. Ind. Med. 54:946–954, 2011. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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