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Health belief model to predict sharps injuries among health care workers at first level care facilities in rural Pakistan

Authors

  • Mohammad Tahir Yousafzai MSc,

    1. Department of Community Health Sciences, The Aga Khan University, Karachi, Pakistan
    2. Department of Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar
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  • Amna Rehana Siddiqui MBBS, FRCP, PhD,

    1. Department of Community Health Sciences, The Aga Khan University, Karachi, Pakistan
    2. Department of Family and Community Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
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  • Naveed Zafar Janjua MBBS, MSc, DrPH

    Corresponding author
    1. British Columbia Centre for Disease Control, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    2. School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    • Epidemiologist, BC Centre for Disease Control & Clinical Assistant Professor, School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, 655 West 12th Avenue, Vancouver, BC V5Z 4R4.
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  • Authors' contribution: Designed the study: MTY, NZJ and ARS. Supervise data collection: MTY. Guided analyses: NZJ and MTY. Analyzed the data: MTY. MTY wrote the first draft and other contributed to revisions. All authors have access to the data (including statistical reports and tables) and can take responsibility for the study.

  • Conflict of Interest: None

Abstract

Background

We assessed the frequency and predictors of sharp injuries (SIs) among health care workers (HCWs) at first level care facilities (FLCF) in rural Pakistan.

Method

HCWs working at public clinic (PC), privately owned licensed practitioners' clinic (LPC) and non-licensed practitioners' clinic(NLC) were interviewed on universal precautions (UPs) and constructs of health belief model (HBM) to assess their association with SIs through negative-binomial regression.

Results

From 365 clinics, 485 HCWs were interviewed. Overall annual rate of SIs was 192/100 HCWs/year; 78/100 HCWs among licensed prescribers, 191/100 HCWs among non-licensed prescribers, 248/100 HCWs among qualified assistants, and 321/100 HCWs among non-qualified assistants. Increasing knowledge score about bloodborne pathogens (BBPs) transmission (rate-ratio (RR): 0.93; 95%CI: 0.89–0.96), fewer years of work experience, being a non-licensed prescriber (RR: 2.02; 95%CI: 1.36–2.98) licensed (RR: 2.86; 9%CI: 1.81–4.51) or non-licensed assistant (RR: 2.78; 95%CI: 1.72–4.47) compared to a licensed prescriber, perceived barriers (RR: 1.06; 95%CI: 1.03–1.08), and compliance with UPs scores (RR: 0.93; 95%CI: 0.87–0.97) were significant predictors of SIs.

Conclusion

Improved knowledge about BBPs, compliance with UPs and reduced barriers to follow UPs could reduce SIs to HCWs. Am. J. Ind. Med. 56:479–487, 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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