Non-robbery-related occupational homicides in the retail industry, 2003–2008

Authors

  • Srinivas Konda MPH,

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Safety Research, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Analysis and Field Evaluations Branch, Morgantown, West Virginia
    • Correspondence to: Srinivas Konda, MPH NIOSH, Division of Safety Research, 1095 Willowdale Road, M/S 1811, Morgantown, WV 26506.

      E-mail: skonda@cdc.gov

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  • Hope M. Tiesman PhD,

    1. Division of Safety Research, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Analysis and Field Evaluations Branch, Morgantown, West Virginia
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  • Scott Hendricks MS,

    1. Division of Safety Research, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Analysis and Field Evaluations Branch, Morgantown, West Virginia
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  • Kelly K. Gurka MPH, PhD

    1. Department of Epidemiology, Injury Control Research Center, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia
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  • The authors declare that that there is no conflict of interest including any financial, personal or other relationships regarding the material discussed in this study.
  • The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

Abstract

Background

The purpose of this study was to examine non-robbery-related occupational homicides in the retail industry from 2003 to 2008.

Methods

Data were abstracted from the Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries. Motive (robbery- or non-robbery-related) and workplace violence (WPV) typology (Type I–IV) were assigned using narrative text fields. Non-robbery-related homicide rates were calculated and compared among WPV types, demographic characteristics, and occupation.

Results

Twenty-eight percent of homicides that occurred in the retail industry were non-robbery-related. The leading event associated with non-robbery-related homicides was Type II (perpetrated by customers) (34%), followed by Type IV (perpetrated by personal relationship) (31%). The majority of homicides were due to arguments (50%). Security guards and workers in drinking establishments had the highest homicide rates per 100,000 workers (14.3 and 6.0, respectively).

Conclusions

Non-robbery-related homicides comprised a meaningful proportion of workplace homicides in the retail industry. Research is needed to develop strategies to prevent non-robbery-related homicides specifically. Am. J. Ind. Med. 57:245–253, 2014. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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