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Keywords:

  • industry;
  • occupation;
  • shift work;
  • cancer screening recommendations;
  • breast cancer;
  • cervical cancer;
  • colorectal cancer

Abstract

Background

Alternative shift work is classified as a probable human carcinogen. Certain cancer screening tests reduce cancer mortality.

Methods

The 2010 National Health Interview Survey was used to examine associations between adherence to breast, cervical, and colon cancer screening recommendations and alternative shift work among female workers.

Results

Workers on alternative shifts, compared to workers on daytime shifts, were more likely to be non-adherent to screening recommendations for breast (34% vs. 23%) and colorectal (55% vs. 48%) cancer (P < 0.05). Workers on alternative shifts in two industries (“Manufacturing” and “Accommodation/Food Services”) and three occupations (“Food Preparation/Serving,” “Personal Care Services,” and “Production”) were more likely to be non-adherent to screening recommendations for at least two cancers (P < 0.05).

Conclusions

The Affordable Care Act eliminates out-of-pocket screening expenses for these three cancers. Greater efforts are needed to promote this benefit, particularly among workers with demonstrated non-adherence. Am. J. Ind. Med. 57:265–275, 2014. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.