Self-reported skin symptoms and skin-related quality of life among Latino immigrant poultry processing and other manual workers

Authors

  • Sara A. Quandt PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, Division of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina
    • Correspondence to: Sara A. Quandt, PhD, Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, Division of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27157. E-mail: squandt@wakehealth.edu

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  • Jill C. Newman MS,

    1. Department of Biostatistical Sciences, Division of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina
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  • Rita Pichardo-Geisinger MD,

    1. Department of Dermatology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina
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  • Dana C. Mora MPH,

    1. Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, Division of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina
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  • Haiying Chen PhD,

    1. Department of Biostatistical Sciences, Division of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina
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  • Steven R. Feldman MD, PhD,

    1. Department of Dermatology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina
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  • Thomas A. Arcury PhD

    1. Department of Family and Community Medicine, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina
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  • Disclosure Statement: The authors report no conflicts of interests.

Abstract

Background

Manual labor employment occurs in environments with exposures likely to impact skin-related quality of life (SRQOL).

Objectives

The objectives of this paper are to (1) document the dimensions of SRQOL, (2) examine its association with skin symptoms, and (3) identify the predictors of SRQOL in Latino manual workers.

Methods

A population-based survey of 733 Latino manual workers obtained Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) and skin symptoms in the prior year.

Results

Two-thirds of workers were employed in production. Skin symptoms in prior year were reported by 23%. Impaired SRQOL was reported by 23%. In multivariate analyses, reduced SRQOL was associated with age, occupation, childhood indigenous language use, and experience of skin symptoms in the prior year.

Conclusions

Despite overall high SRQOL exposures in some immigrant occupational groups produce reduce SRQOL. This rural, immigrant population faces significant obstacles to obtaining dermatological care; efforts are needed to improve their SRQOL. Am. J. Ind. Med. 57:605–614, 2014. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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