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Col2-GFP reporter mouse—A new tool to study skeletal development

Authors

  • Jae Y. Cho,

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    • Jae Y. Cho is an M.D., Ph.D. graduate student in Molecular and Medical Genetics at Oregon Health Sciences University. He has a BA from Rice University and plans to be a physician-scientist in Pediatric Neurology.

  • T. Dawn Grant,

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    • T. Dawn Grant, Ph.D., used her background in confocal microscopy to develop the methods to visualize GFP in the developing skeleton of live mouse embryos. She is currently Academic Coordinator for the Science Program at Washington State University-Vancouver, Washington.

  • Gregory P. Lunstrum,

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    • Gregory P. Lunstrum has a Ph.D. from UCLA and now serves as a senior research associate at the Shriners Research Center in Portland. He has developed methods to analyze cartilage cells from the Col2-GFP reporter mice.

  • William A. Horton

    Corresponding author
    • Research Center, Shriners Hospital for Children, 3101 S.W. Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, Oregon 97201.
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    • William A. Horton, M.D., has a long-standing research interest in skeletal growth and developing methods to study it in human tissues and in mouse models of growth deficiency. He is Director of Research at the Shriners Research Center and Professor of Molecular and Medical Genetics at Oregon Health Sciences University in Portland.


Abstract

Transgenic mice were generated that harbor a Col2-GFP reporter that marks chondrocytes and their immediate precursors during skeletal development. Cells engaged in chondrogenesis were identified by conventional fluorescence microscopy and confocal optical sectioning within their native environments in live embryos and in thick tissue slices. The use of these mice offers a novel approach for studying the role of chondrocytes in skeletal development. © 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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