Genome survey for susceptibility loci for recurrent, early-onset major depression: Results at 10cM resolution

Authors

  • George S. Zubenko,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    2. Department of Biological Sciences, Mellon College of Science, Carnegie-Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    • Room E1230, 3811 O'Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213.
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  • Hugh B. Hughes,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
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  • J. Scott Stiffler,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
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  • Wendy N. Zubenko,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
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  • Barry B. Kaplan

    1. Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    2. Laboratory of Molecular Biology, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, Maryland
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Abstract

Recurrent (two or more episodes), early-onset (first episode at ≤ 25 years) major depressive disorder (RE-MDD) is a strongly familial condition (λfirst-degreerelatives = 8) whose malignant effects have a significant negative impact on the health and longevity of patients and their family members. The goal of this study was to identify candidate susceptibility loci that influence the development of RE-MDD. We completed a systematic survey of the human genome, conducted at an average resolution of 10 cM, for the identification of simple sequence tandem repeat polymorphisms (SSTRPs) that target susceptibility genes for RE-MDD by virtue of linkage disequilibrium. The efficiency of our association study was enhanced by genotyping pools of DNA from 100 adults with RE-MDD and 100 adult controls who had no personal or family history of mental disorders. Both groups included equal numbers of Caucasian men and women and were matched as closely as possible for age and ethnicity. Allelic associations with RE-MDD were observed for 19 of the 387 SSTRPs in the CHLC Human Screening Set/Weber Version 9. Sixteen of the 19 candidate susceptibility loci revealed significant allelic associations with RE-MDD in men (n = 7) or women (n = 9), but not in both sexes. Evidence for both risk and protective alleles was detected. Two of the candidate susceptibility loci reside within several Mb of loci previously reported-megabases to be linked to “comorbid alcoholism and depression” in families of individuals with alcoholism and to a broadly defined affected phenotype that included recurrent major depression in the families of patients with bipolar disorder. Although it has been suggested that the genes that influence risk for MDD in the two sexes may not be entirely the same, the results of our study suggest that sex specificity of susceptibility loci for RE-MDD may be the rule rather than the exception. The observed preponderance of sex-specific susceptibility loci for RE-MDD suggests that there may be important differences in the molecular pathophysiology of RE-MDD in men and women. Alternatively, our findings may reflect the existence of sex-specific differences in the molecular mechanisms that determine resilience to endogenous or environmental depressogenic stimuli. © 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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