Role of leptin in regulating appetite, neuroendocrine function, and bone remodeling

Authors

  • M. Michael Cohen Jr.

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Pediatrics, Dalhousie University, 5981 University Ave., Halifax, Nova Scotia
    • Department of Pediatrics, Dalhousie University, 5981 University Ave., Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 3J5.
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Abstract

Leptin, a hormone secreted by adipocytes, acts on the hypothalamus to regulate appetite and neuroendocrine function. In the hypothalamus, both the arcuate nucleus and the ventromedial nucleus express leptin receptors. Specific neurons in the arcuate nucleus regulate appetite and reproduction. In contrast, neurons in the ventromedial nucleus regulate bone mass. The melanocortin system is the downstream pathway for regulating appetite and neuroendocrine function. In contrast, the sympathetic nervous system is the downstream pathway for regulating bone mass. Leptin, in regulating food intake and body weight, acts, in part, by inhibiting the synthesis of neuropeptide Y and its release from the hypothalamus. The leptin and insulin pathways may interact and may be important in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome. © 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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