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An unclassifiable short rib-polydactyly syndrome with acromesomelic hypomineralization and campomelia in siblings

Authors

  • Peter Kannu,

    1. Genetic Health Services Victoria, Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia
    2. Skeletal Biology and Disease, Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia
    3. Department of Paediatrics, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia
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  • Jeannette H. McFarlane,

    1. Anatomic Pathology, LabPlus, Auckland, New Zealand
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  • Ravi Savarirayan,

    1. Genetic Health Services Victoria, Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia
    2. Skeletal Biology and Disease, Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia
    3. Department of Paediatrics, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia
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  • Salim Aftimos

    Corresponding author
    1. Northern Regional Genetics Service, Auckland, New Zealand
    • Northern Regional Genetics Service, Auckland, New Zealand.
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  • How to cite this article: Kannu P, McFarlane JH, Savarirayan R, Aftimos S. 2007. An unclassifiable short rib-polydactyly syndrome with acromesomelic hypomineralization and campomelia in siblings. Am J Med Genet Part A 143A:2607–2611.

Abstract

The short rib-polydactyly (SRP) group are lethal skeletal dysplasias with an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern that can be distinguished on radiological and histological grounds. We report on two consecutive pregnancies complicated by a SRP syndrome with acromesomelic hypomineralization and campomelia that cannot be definitely categorized, yet possesses features of this group of conditions. The skeletal changes observed in both cases included markedly shortened ribs, shortened humeri and femora, limb bowing, absent ossification of the radii, ulnae, tibiae and fibulae, as well as the bony elements of the hands and feet, hypoplastic scapulae and peritoneal calcifications. In one case, the pancreas was abnormal in shape, without a tail and the spleen was not identified. Ectopic splenic tissue and intestinal malrotation were identified and were suggestive of a laterality disorder. Whether these two cases should be considered an atypical form of SRP cannot be completely resolved at this present time and will need to wait on further progress in molecular testing. © 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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