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Fragile X syndrome with anxiety disorder and exceptional verbal intelligence

Authors

  • Kathleen Angkustsiri,

    Corresponding author
    1. M.I.N.D. Institute, University of California-Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California
    2. Department of Pediatrics, University of California-Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California
    • UC Davis M.I.N.D. Institute, 2825 50th Street, Sacramento, CA 95817.
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  • Juthamas Wirojanan,

    1. M.I.N.D. Institute, University of California-Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California
    2. Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Hatyai, Songkhla, Thailand
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  • Lesley J. Deprey,

    1. M.I.N.D. Institute, University of California-Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California
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  • Louise W. Gane,

    1. M.I.N.D. Institute, University of California-Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California
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  • Randi J. Hagerman

    1. M.I.N.D. Institute, University of California-Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California
    2. Department of Pediatrics, University of California-Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California
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  • How to cite this article: Angkustsiri K, Wirojanan J, Deprey LJ, Gane LW, Hagerman RJ. 2008. Fragile X syndrome with anxiety disorder and exceptional verbal intelligence. Am J Med Genet Part A 146A:376–379.

Abstract

Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is often characterized by mental retardation. However, FXS is also associated with significant emotional and psychiatric problems, including anxiety, depression, attention difficulties, and learning disabilities in the presence of a normal IQ. This report describes a unique woman with the full mutation of FXS who has an exceptional profile of above-average intelligence combined with significant impairments due to anxiety and learning disability. Women with FXS can present primarily with learning and emotional problems, and clinicians should consider FXS in these women regardless of their IQ. © 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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