Get access

Genetic assessment of breast cancer risk in primary care practice

Authors

  • Wylie Burke,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Bioethics and Humanities, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
    2. Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington
    3. Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
    • Department of Bioethics and Humanities, University of Washington, Box 357120, 1959 NE Pacific, Rm A204, Seattle, WA 98195-7120.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Julie Culver,

    1. Department of Bioethics and Humanities, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
    2. Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Clinical Cancer Genetics, City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, 1500 E. Duarte Rd., Mod 173, Duarte, CA 91010.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Linda Pinsky,

    1. Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Sarah Hall,

    1. Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Susan E. Reynolds,

    1. Department of Bioethics and Humanities, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Yutaka Yasui,

    1. Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Nancy Press

    1. Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon
    Search for more papers by this author

  • How to cite this article: Burke W, Culver J, Pinsky L, Hall S, Reynolds SE, Yasui Y, Press N. 2009. Genetic assessment of breast cancer risk in primary care practice. Am J Med Genet Part A 149A:349–356.

Abstract

Family history is increasingly important in primary care as a means to detect candidates for genetic testing or tailored prevention programs. We evaluated primary care physicians' skills in assessing family history for breast cancer risk, using unannounced standardized patient (SP) visits to 86 general internists and family medicine practitioners in King County, WA. Transcripts of clinical encounters were coded to determine ascertainment of family history, risk assessment, and clinical follow-up. Physicians in our study collected sufficient family history to assess breast cancer risk in 48% of encounters with an anxious patient at moderate risk, 100% of encounters with a patient who had a strong maternal family history of breast cancer, and 45% of encounters with a patient who had a strong paternal family history of breast and ovarian cancer. Increased risk was usually communicated in terms of recommendations for preventive action. Few physicians referred patients to genetic counseling, few associated ovarian cancer with breast cancer risk, and some incorrectly discounted paternal family history of breast cancer. We conclude that pedigree assessment of breast cancer risk is feasible in primary care, but may occur consistently only when a strong maternal family history is present. Primary care education should focus on the link between inherited breast and ovarian cancer risk and on the significance of paternal family history. Educational efforts may be most successful when they emphasize the value of genetic counseling for individuals at risk for inherited cancer and the connection between genetic risk and specific prevention measures. © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Ancillary