West syndrome associated with mosaic duplication of FOXG1 in a patient with maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 14

Authors


  • How to Cite this Article: Tohyama J, Yamamoto T, Hosoki K, Nagasaki K, Akasaka N, Ohashi T, Kobayashi Y, Saitoh S. 2011. West syndrome associated with mosaic duplication of FOXG1 in a patient with maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 14. Am J Med Genet Part A 155:2584–2588.

Abstract

FOXG1 on chromosome 14 has recently been suggested as a dosage-sensitive gene. Duplication of this gene could cause severe epilepsy and developmental delay, including infantile spasms. Here, we report on a female patient diagnosed with maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 14 and West syndrome who carried a small supernumerary marker chromosome. A chromosomal analysis revealed mosaicism of 47,XX, + mar[8]/46,XX[18]. Spectral karyotyping multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis confirmed that the marker chromosome was derived from chromosome 14. A DNA methylation test at MEG3 in 14q32.2 and microsatellite analysis using polymorphic markers on chromosome 14 confirmed that the patient had maternal uniparental disomy 14 as well as a mosaic small marker chromosome of paternal origin containing the proximal long arm of chromosome 14. Microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization analysis conclusively defined the region of the gain of genomic copy numbers at 14q11.2-q12, encompassing FOXG1. The results of the analyses of our patient provide further evidence that not only duplication but also a small increase in the dosage of FOXG1 could cause infantile spasms. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Ancillary