The Barth Syndrome Registry: Distinguishing disease characteristics and growth data from a longitudinal study


  • Disclosures: Dr. Spencer is a paid consultant for the Barth Syndrome Foundation Registry.

  • How to Cite this Article: Roberts AE, Nixon C, Steward CG, Gauvreau K, Maisenbacher M, Fletcher M, Geva J, Byrne BJ, Spencer CT. 2012. The Barth Syndrome Registry: Distinguishing disease characteristics and growth data from a longitudinal study. Am J Med Genet Part A 158A: 2726–2732.


Barth syndrome (BTHS); MIM accession # 302060) is a rare X-linked recessive cardioskeletal mitochondrial myopathy with features of cardiomyopathy, neutropenia, and growth abnormalities. The objectives of this study were to further elucidate the natural history, clinical disease presentation, and course, and describe growth characteristics for males with BTHS. Patients with a confirmed genetic diagnosis of BTHS are referred to the BTHS Registry through the Barth Syndrome Foundation, self-referral, or physician referral. This study is based on data obtained from 73 subjects alive at the time of enrollment that provided self-reported and/or medical record abstracted data. The mean age at diagnosis of BTHS was 4.04 ± 5.45 years. While the vast majority of subjects reported a history of cardiac dysfunction, nearly 6% denied any history of cardiomyopathy. Although most subjects had only mildly abnormal cardiac function by echocardiography reports, 70% were recognized as having cardiomyopathy in the first year of life and 12% have required cardiac transplantation. Of the 73 enrolled subjects, there have been five deaths. Growth curves were generated demonstrating a shift down for weight, length, and height versus the normative population with late catch up in height for a significant percentage of cases. This data also confirms a significant number of patients with low birth weight, complications in the newborn period, failure to thrive, neutropenia, developmental delay of motor milestones, and mild learning difficulties. However, it is apparent that the disease manifestations are variable, both over time for an individual patient and across the BTHS population. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.