Obsessive-compulsive disorder in patients with velocardiofacial (22q11 deletion) syndrome

Authors

  • Doron Gothelf,

    Corresponding author
    1. Behavioral Genetics Clinic, Schneider Children's Medical Center of Israel, Petah Tiqwa, Israel
    2. Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University; Tel Aviv, Israel
    • Richard E. Feinberg Department of Psychiatry, Schneider Children's Medical Center of Israel, 14 Kaplan St., P.O. Box 559, Petah Tiqwa 49202 Israel.
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  • Gadi Presburger,

    1. Behavioral Genetics Clinic, Schneider Children's Medical Center of Israel, Petah Tiqwa, Israel
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  • Ada H. Zohar,

    1. Department of Psychology, Behavioral Sciences, Ruppin Academic Center, Emek Hefer, Israel
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  • Merav Burg,

    1. Behavioral Genetics Clinic, Schneider Children's Medical Center of Israel, Petah Tiqwa, Israel
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  • Ariela Nahmani,

    1. Cleft Palate Unit, Sapir Medical Center, Kfar Saba, Israel
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  • Moshe Frydman,

    1. Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University; Tel Aviv, Israel
    2. Institute of Medical Genetics, Haim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer; Dr., Israel
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  • Mordechai Shohat,

    1. Behavioral Genetics Clinic, Schneider Children's Medical Center of Israel, Petah Tiqwa, Israel
    2. Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University; Tel Aviv, Israel
    3. Department of Medical Genetics, Rabin Medical Center, Petah Tiqwa, Israel
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  • Dov Inbar,

    1. Behavioral Genetics Clinic, Schneider Children's Medical Center of Israel, Petah Tiqwa, Israel
    2. Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University; Tel Aviv, Israel
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  • Ayala Aviram-Goldring,

    1. Behavioral Genetics Clinic, Schneider Children's Medical Center of Israel, Petah Tiqwa, Israel
    2. Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University; Tel Aviv, Israel
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  • Josepha Yeshaya,

    1. Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University; Tel Aviv, Israel
    2. Department of Medical Genetics, Rabin Medical Center, Petah Tiqwa, Israel
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  • Tamar Steinberg,

    1. Behavioral Genetics Clinic, Schneider Children's Medical Center of Israel, Petah Tiqwa, Israel
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  • Yehuda Finkelstein,

    1. Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University; Tel Aviv, Israel
    2. Cleft Palate Unit, Sapir Medical Center, Kfar Saba, Israel
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  • Amos Frisch,

    1. Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University; Tel Aviv, Israel
    2. Felsenstein Medical Research Center, Petah Tiqwa, Israel
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  • Abraham Weizman,

    1. Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University; Tel Aviv, Israel
    2. Felsenstein Medical Research Center, Petah Tiqwa, Israel
    3. Geha Mental-Health Center, Petah Tiqwa, Israel
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  • Alan Apter

    1. Behavioral Genetics Clinic, Schneider Children's Medical Center of Israel, Petah Tiqwa, Israel
    2. Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University; Tel Aviv, Israel
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Abstract

The study of neurogenetic microdeletion syndromes provides an insight into the developmental psychopathology of psychiatric disorders. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of psychiatric disorders, especially obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), in patients with velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), a 22q11 microdeletion syndrome. Forty-three subjects with VCFS of mean age 18.3 ± 10.6 years were comprehensively assessed using semi-structured psychiatric interview and the Yale–Brown obsessive compulsive scale (Y-BOCS). Best estimate diagnoses were made on the basis of information gathered from subjects, parents, teachers, and social workers. Fourteen VCFS subjects (32.6%) met the DSM-IV criteria for OCD. OCD had an early age of onset and generally responded to fluoxetine treatment. It was not related to mental retardation. The most common obsessive-compulsive symptoms were contamination, aggression, somatic worries, hoarding, repetitive questions, and cleaning. Sixteen of the 43 patients (37.2%) had attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and 7 (16.2%) had psychotic disorder. The results of our study suggest that there is a strong association between VCFS and early-onset OCD. This finding may be significant in the understanding of the underlying genetic basis of OCD. © 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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