Evidence of linkage to psychosis on chromosome 5q33-34 in pedigrees ascertained for bipolar disorder

Authors

  • Berit Kerner,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, Center for Neurobehavioral Genetics, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California
    • Department of Psychiatry, UCLA Center for Neurobehavioral Genetics, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, 695 Charles E. Young Drive South, Room 3554A, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1761.
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  • Diana L. Brugman,

    1. Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, Center for Neurobehavioral Genetics, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California
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  • Nelson B. Freimer

    1. Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, Center for Neurobehavioral Genetics, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California
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  • Please cite this article as follows: Kerner B, Brugman DL, Freimer NB. 2007. Evidence of Linkage to Psychosis on Chromosome 5q33-34 in Pedigrees Ascertained for Bipolar Disorder. Am J Med Genet Part B 144B:74–78.

Abstract

It is hypothesized that the presence of psychotic features may define a subtype of bipolar disorder that is more homogeneous in its genetic predisposition than bipolar disorder as a whole. We used psychosis as an alternative phenotype definition in a re-analysis of the NIMH Bipolar Genetics Initiative data sets. In this analysis we selected only those families in which at least two members were diagnosed with bipolar disorder type 1 with psychotic features. This analysis identified a linkage signal on chromosome 5q33-q34, a region previously implicated in independent linkage studies of schizophrenia and of psychosis, broadly defined. This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that susceptibility to psychosis may characterize at least a subtype of bipolar disorder. © 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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