Is MYO9B the missing link between schizophrenia and celiac disease?

Authors

  • Bart J. Jungerius,

    1. Complex Genetics Section, DBG-Department Medical Genetics, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands
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  • Steven C. Bakker,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, Ruldolph Magnus Institute of Neuroscience, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands
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  • Alienke J. Monsuur,

    1. Complex Genetics Section, DBG-Department Medical Genetics, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands
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  • Richard J. Sinke,

    1. Complex Genetics Section, DBG-Department Medical Genetics, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands
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  • Rene S. Kahn,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, Ruldolph Magnus Institute of Neuroscience, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands
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  • Cisca Wijmenga

    Corresponding author
    1. Complex Genetics Section, DBG-Department Medical Genetics, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands
    2. Department of Genetics, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands
    • Genetics Department, University Medical Center Groningen, Room E2.030, PO Box 30000, 9700 RB Groningen, The Netherlands.
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    • Professor of Human Genetics and Head of Genetics Department.


  • Please cite this article as follows: Jungerius BJ, Bakker SC, Monsuur AJ, Sinke RJ, Kahn RS, Wijmenga C. 2008. Is MYO9B the Missing Link Between Schizophrenia and Celiac Disease? Am J Med Genet Part B 147B: 351–355.

Abstract

There has long been discussion on the correlation between schizophrenia and autoimmune diseases (especially celiac disease), which makes the recently discovered celiac disease risk factor, MYO9B, an attractive functional and positional candidate gene for schizophrenia. To test this hypothesis we compared allele frequencies of three MYO9B tag SNPs in 315 schizophrenia cases and 1,624 healthy controls in a genetic association study. Highly significant differences in allele frequencies between schizophrenia cases and healthy controls were observed for SNP rs2305767 in intron 14 of MYO9B (P = 1.16 × 10−4; OR 1.41, 95% CI 1.18–1.67). We demonstrate significant association of allelic variants in MYO9B with schizophrenia. To our knowledge, this is the first molecular genetic evidence for a correlation between autoimmune diseases and the risk of developing schizophrenia. © 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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