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Candidate genes for schizophrenia: A survey of association studies and gene ranking

Authors

  • Jingchun Sun,

    1. Department of Psychiatry and Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia
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  • Po-Hsiu Kuo,

    1. Department of Psychiatry and Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia
    2. Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan
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  • Brien P. Riley,

    1. Department of Psychiatry and Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia
    2. Department of Human Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia
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  • Kenneth S. Kendler,

    1. Department of Psychiatry and Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia
    2. Department of Human Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia
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  • Zhongming Zhao

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychiatry and Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia
    2. Department of Human Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia
    3. Center for the Study of Biological Complexity, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia
    • Department of Psychiatry, Virginia Commonwealth University, 800 East Leigh Street, Suite 118, Richmond, Virginia 23298.
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  • Please cite this article as follows: Sun J, Kuo P-H, Riley BP, Kendler KS, Zhao Z. 2008. Candidate Genes for Schizophrenia: A Survey of Association Studies and Gene Ranking. Am J Med Genet Part B 147B:1173–1181.

Abstract

More than 500 genes have been reported with positive or negative association with schizophrenia. The wealth of this information, along with the complex nature of psychiatric disorders, provides a challenging but also unique opportunity for the investigation of molecular and cellular mechanisms in schizophrenia. In this study, we performed a comprehensive survey of the published association studies collected in the SchizophreniaGene database. We observed over time a strong trend for increases in the number of published reports, the number of studied genes, and the sample size of the studies. We also examined the studies, genes, and sample sizes in different ethnic populations and the distribution of these association studies and their employed markers among these susceptibility genes. We then selected and ranked candidate genes using a combined odds ratio method. The evaluation of this candidate gene set against sets selected by other methods suggested its utility in follow-up association studies and in further bioinformatics analysis. We also examined the functional biases of the selected genes. © 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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