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Keywords:

  • NPL analysis;
  • haplotype sharing;
  • extended pedigrees;
  • schizophrenia

Abstract

Extended pedigrees are not only very useful to identify disease genes for rare Mendelian conditions, but they may also help unravel the genetics of complex diseases such as schizophrenia. In this study we performed genome-wide multipoint non-parametric linkage (NPL) score calculations using 825 microsatellites and 5,366 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), respectively, and searched for haplotypes shared by affected individuals, in three multiplex families including 29 genotyped affected individuals which in total contains 49 relative pairs useful for linkage studies. The most consistent results for microsatellites and SNPs were observed on 2q12.3–q14.1 (NPL scores 2.0, empirical P-value 0.009). However, the overall highest NPL score was observed on chromosome 2q33.3 using SNPs (NPL score 2.2, empirical P-value 0.007). Other chromosomal regions were detected on 5q15-q22.1, with microsatellites (NPL scores 1.7, empirical P-value 0.021) and with SNPs (NPL scores 2.0, empirical P-value 0.010) and on 5q23.1 (NPL score 1.9, empirical P-value 0.012) and 8q24.1–q24.2 (NPL score 2.1, empirical P-value 0.009) when using SNPs. The analysis of extended pedigrees allowed the search for haplotypes inherited identical by decent (IBD) by affected individuals. In all regions with NPL score >1.9 we found haplotypes inherited IBD by multiple cases. However, no common haplotypes were found for affected individuals in all families. In conclusion our NPL results support earlier findings suggesting that 2q and possibly 5q and 8q contain susceptibility loci for schizophrenia. Haplotype sharing in families helped to delimit the detected regions that potentially are susceptibility loci for schizophrenia. © 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.