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Criteria for validating mouse models of psychiatric diseases

Authors

  • Kathryn K. Chadman,

    Corresponding author
    1. Laboratory of Behavioral Neuroscience, Intramural Research Program, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, Maryland
    • Laboratory of Behavioral Neuroscience, IRP, NIMH, NIH, Building 35 Room 1C-909, Mail Stop 3730, Bethesda, MD 20892-3730.
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  • Mu Yang,

    1. Laboratory of Behavioral Neuroscience, Intramural Research Program, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, Maryland
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  • Jacqueline N. Crawley

    1. Laboratory of Behavioral Neuroscience, Intramural Research Program, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, Maryland
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  • This article is a US Government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

  • Please cite this article as follows: Chadman KK, Yang M, Crawley JN. 2008. Criteria for Validating Mouse Models of Psychiatric Diseases. Am J Med Genet Part B 150B:1–11.

Abstract

Animal models of human diseases are in widespread use for biomedical research. Mouse models with a mutation in a single gene or multiple genes are excellent research tools for understanding the role of a specific gene in the etiology of a human genetic disease. Ideally, the mouse phenotypes will recapitulate the human phenotypes exactly. However, exact matches are rare, particularly in mouse models of neuropsychiatric disorders. This article summarizes the current strategies for optimizing the validity of a mouse model of a human brain dysfunction. We address the common question raised by molecular geneticists and clinical researchers in psychiatry, “what is a ‘good enough’ mouse model”11 Published 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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