A comparison of molecular alterations in environmental and genetic rat models of ADHD: A pilot study

Authors

  • Tania DasBanerjee,

    1. Department of Neuroscience and Physiology, State University of New York (SUNY) Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, New York
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  • Frank A. Middleton,

    1. Department of Neuroscience and Physiology, State University of New York (SUNY) Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, New York
    2. Department of Psychiatry, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, New York
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  • David F. Berger,

    1. Department of Psychology, SUNY College at Cortland, Cortland, New York
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  • John P. Lombardo,

    1. Department of Psychology, SUNY College at Cortland, Cortland, New York
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  • Terje Sagvolden,

    1. Department of Physiology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway
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  • Stephen V. Faraone

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Neuroscience and Physiology, State University of New York (SUNY) Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, New York
    2. Department of Psychiatry, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, New York
    • Department of Psychiatry, SUNY Upstate Medical University, 750 E Adams St, Syracuse, NY 13210.
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  • Please cite this article as follows: DasBanerjee T, Middleton FA, Berger DF, Lombardo JP, Sagvolden T, Faraone SV. 2008. A Comparison of Molecular Alterations in Environmental and Genetic Rat Models of ADHD: A Pilot Study. Am J Med Genet Part B 147B:1554–1563.

Abstract

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most common neurobehavioral disorder in school-aged children. In addition to genetic factors, environmental influences or gene × environmental interactions also play an important role in ADHD. One example of a well studied environmental risk factor for ADHD is exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). In this study, we investigated whether the well-established genetic model of ADHD based on the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) and a well established PCB-based model of ADHD exhibited similar molecular changes in brain circuits involved in ADHD. The brains from 28 male rats (8 SHR, 8 Sprague–Dawley (SD) controls, 8 Wistar/Kyoto (WKY) controls, and 4 PCB-exposed SD rats) were harvested at postnatal days (PNDs) 55–65 and RNA was isolated from six brain regions of interest. The RNA was analyzed for differences in expression of a set of 308 probe sets interrogating 218 unique genes considered highly relevant to ADHD or epigenetic gene regulation using the Rat RAE230 2.0 GeneChip (Affymetrix). Selected observations were confirmed by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. The results show that the expression levels of genes Gnal, COMT, Adrbk1, Ntrk2, Hk1, Syt11, and Csnk1a1 were altered in both the SHR rats and the PCB-exposed SD rats. Arrb2, Stx12, Aqp6, Syt1, Ddc, and Pgk1 expression levels were changed only in the PCB-exposed SD rats. Genes with altered expression only in the SHRs included Oprm1, Calcyon, Calmodulin, Lhx1, and Hes6. The epigenetic genes Crebbp, Mecp2, and Hdac5 are significantly altered in both models. The data provide strong evidence that genes and environment can affect different set of genes in two different models of ADHD and yet result in the similar disease-like symptoms. © 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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