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Keywords:

  • seizures;
  • array CGH;
  • copy-number variants;
  • KCNJ3, WWOX;
  • CDH15;
  • IMMP2L

Abstract

Copy-number variants (CNVs) collectively represent an important cause of neurodevelopmental disorders such as developmental delay (DD)/intellectual disability (ID), autism, and epilepsy. In contrast to DD/ID, for which the application of microarray techniques enables detection of pathogenic CNVs in ∼10–20% of patients, there are only few studies of the role of CNVs in epilepsy and genetic etiology in the vast majority of cases remains unknown. We have applied whole-genome exon-targeted oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) to a cohort of 102 patients with various types of epilepsy with or without additional neurodevelopmental abnormalities. Chromosomal microarray analysis revealed 24 non-polymorphic CNVs in 23 patients, among which 10 CNVs are known to be clinically relevant. Two rare deletions in 2q24.1q24.3, including KCNJ3 and 9q21.13 are novel pathogenic genetic loci and 12 CNVs are of unknown clinical significance. Our results further support the notion that rare CNVs can cause different types of epilepsy, emphasize the efficiency of detecting novel candidate genes by whole-genome array CGH, and suggest that the clinical application of array CGH should be extended to patients with unexplained epilepsies. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.