Get access

Investigation of association of serotonin transporter and monoamine oxidase-A genes with Alzheimer's disease and depression in the VITA study cohort: A 90-month longitudinal study

Authors

  • Claus-Jürgen Scholz,

    1. Interdisciplinary Centre for Clinical Research (IZKF), University Hospital of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Susanne Jungwirth,

    1. Ludwig Boltzmann Society, L. Boltzmann Institute of Aging Research, Vienna, Austria
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Walter Danielczyk,

    1. Ludwig Boltzmann Society, L. Boltzmann Institute of Aging Research, Vienna, Austria
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Heike Weber,

    1. Interdisciplinary Centre for Clinical Research (IZKF), University Hospital of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Ildiko Wichart,

    1. Ludwig Boltzmann Society, L. Boltzmann Institute of Aging Research, Vienna, Austria
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Karl Heinz Tragl,

    1. Ludwig Boltzmann Society, L. Boltzmann Institute of Aging Research, Vienna, Austria
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Peter Fischer,

    1. Ludwig Boltzmann Society, L. Boltzmann Institute of Aging Research, Vienna, Austria
    2. Department of Psychiatry, Social Medicine Center East—Donauspital, Vienna, Austria
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Peter Riederer,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, Psychosomatic and Psychotherapy, University Hospital of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jürgen Deckert,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, Psychosomatic and Psychotherapy, University Hospital of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Edna Grünblatt

    Corresponding author
    1. Ludwig Boltzmann Society, L. Boltzmann Institute of Aging Research, Vienna, Austria
    2. Department of Psychiatry, Psychosomatic and Psychotherapy, University Hospital of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany
    3. Neuroscience Center Zurich, University of Zurich and ETH Zurich, Zürich, Switzerland
    4. University Clinics of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland
    • Correspondence to:

      Edna Grünblatt, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Zurich, Thurgauerstr. 39, CH-8050 Zurich, Switzerland.

      E-mail: edna.gruenblatt@kjpdzh.ch

    Search for more papers by this author

  • Susanne Jungwirth, Karl-Heinz Tragl, Peter Fischer, Peter Riederer, and Edna Grünblatt designed the study and wrote the protocol. Susanne Jungwirth and Peter Fischer contributed substantially to acquisition of subjects and data. Claus-Jürgen Scholz, Susanne Jungwirth, Wichart Ildiko, Heike Weber, Jürgen Deckert, and Edna Grünblatt managed the literature searches and analyses. Claus-Jürgen Scholz undertook the statistical analysis. Claus-Jürgen Scholz, Peter Riederer, Jürgen Deckert, and Edna Grünblatt wrote the first draft of the manuscript. All the authors contributed to and have approved the final manuscript.
  • None of the authors has any actual or potential conflict of interest, including any financial, personal or other relationships with other people or organizations within three years of beginning the work submitted that could inappropriately influence, or be perceived to influence, this work.

Abstract

Alzheimer's disease (AD) and depression (DE) are common psychiatric disorders strongly intertwined with one another. Nevertheless, etiology and early diagnosis of the disorders are still elusive. Several genetic variations have been suggested to associate with AD and DE, particularly in genes involved in the serotonergic system such as the serotonin transporter (SERT/SLC6A4), responsible for the removal from the synaptic cleft, and the monoamine-oxidase-A (MAOA), responsible for the presynaptic degradation of serotonin. Here, we attempt to characterize this pleiotropic effect for the triallelic SERT gene-linked polymorphic region (5HTTLPR) and for the MAOA-uVNTR, in participants in the Vienna-Transdanube-Aging (VITA)-study. The VITA-study is a community-based longitudinal study following a birth cohort (75 years old at baseline examination, n = 606) from Vienna for a period of 90 months with a regular follow-up interval of 30 months. Our main finding, confirming previous reports, is that the 5HTTLPR S-allele is a risk allele for DE (OR = 1.55 CI 95% 1.03–2.32) and its carriers had a steeper increase in SGDS sum score. No association to AD was found. MAOA-uVNTR did not associate with either AD or DE. However, in AD MAOA-uVNTR S-allele carriers a steeper increase of HAMD and STAI1 sum scores (P < 0.05) was observed. Although the VITA-study cohort is rather small with low power to detect gene alterations, the uniqueness of this very thoroughly investigated and homogenous cohort strengthens the results through exceptional data collection. Still, reinvestigation in a larger cohort similar to this, as well as a meta-analysis, is important to confirm these results. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Ancillary