Clinical care in craniofacial microsomia: A review of current management recommendations and opportunities to advance research

Authors

  • C.L. Heike,

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    • Dr. Carrie Heike is a craniofacial pediatrician in the Craniofacial Center at Seattle Children's Hospital and the University of Washington.
  • A.V. Hing,

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    • Dr. Anne Hing is a craniofacial pediatrician and medical geneticist in the Craniofacial Center at Seattle Children's Hospital and the University of Washington. Dr. Hing has 20 years experience in clinical genetics and over 13 years experience in the diagnosis and management of children with craniofacial microsomia. She is the co-author of the Craniofacial Microsomia publication in GeneReviews and has long-standing interesting in disorders of branchial arch development.
  • C.A. Aspinall,

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    • Ms. Cassandra Aspinall is a Master's level social worker in the Children's Craniofacial Center at Seattle Children's Hospital where she has worked for over 25 years. She is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the School of Social Work at the University of Washington in Seattle. Her research interests and publications are focused on issues related to bioethics and the quality of life of patients born with craniofacial conditions.
  • S.P. Bartlett,

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    • Dr. Scott Bartlett is a craniofacial reconstructive surgeon and Director of the Craniofacial Program at Chief of the Division of Plastics Surgery at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. He conducts clinical and translational research in craniofacial developmental biology.
  • C.B. Birgfeld,

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    • Dr. Craig Birgfeld is a craniofacial reconstructive surgeon at Craniofacial Center at Seattle Children's Hospital and the University of Washington.
  • A.F. Drake,

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    • Dr. Amelia Drake is a pediatric otolaryngologist and Director of the University of North Carolina Craniofacial Center.
  • L.A. Pimenta,

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    • Dr. Luiz Pimenta is a dentist with a doctorate in restorative dentistry/prosthodontics. He is the Dental Director for the University of North Carolina Craniofacial Center, University of North Carolina School of Dentistry, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
  • K.C. Sie,

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    • Dr. Kathleen Sie is a pediatric otolaryngologist at the University of Washington and Craniofacial Center at Seattle Children's Hospital. She serves at the Director of the Seattle Children's Microtia Clinic and Childhood Communication Center.
  • M.M. Urata,

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    • Dr. Mark Urata is a craniofacial reconstructive surgeon, oral and maxillofacial surgeon. He is Chief of the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California, and Head of the Division of Plastic and Maxillofacial Surgery at Children's Hospital Los Angeles.
  • D. Vivaldi,

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    • Dr. Daniela Vivaldi is a general dentist at the Craniofacial Center at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.
  • D.V. Luquetti

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    • Dr. Daniela Luquetti is a medical geneticist and epidemiologist in the Craniofacial Center at Seattle Children's Hospital and the University of Washington. Her research includes studying potential genetic and non-genetic causes of birth defects.

Correspondence to: Carrie L. Heike, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Craniofacial Medicine, Seattle Children's Hospital, P.O. Box 5371, M/S W7847, Seattle, WA 98105-5371. E-mail: carrie.heike@seattlechildrens.org

Abstract

Craniofacial microsomia (CFM) is a complex condition associated with microtia, mandibular hypoplasia, and preauricular tags. It is the second most common congenital facial condition treated in many craniofacial centers and requires longitudinal multidisciplinary patient care. The purpose of this article is to summarize current recommendations for clinical management and discuss opportunities to advance clinical research in CFM. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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