A preliminary study of resource overlap between howling monkeys (Alouatta palliata) and other arboreal mammals in the tropical rain forest of Los Tuxtlas, Mexico

Authors

  • Alejandro Estrada,

    Corresponding author
    1. Estación de Biología Los Tuxtlas, Instituto de Biología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Veracruz, México
    • Estación de Biología Los Tuxtlas, Instituto de Biología-UNAM, Apartado Postal 94, San Andrés Tuxtla, Veracruz, México
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Rosamond Coates-Estrada

    1. Estación de Biología Los Tuxtlas, Instituto de Biología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Veracruz, México
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Potential resource overlap between howling monkeys and other arboreal mammals was studied in the rain forest of Los Tuxtlas, Veracruz, Mexico. Eight species of mammals belonging to the orders Primates, Carnivora, Rodentia, and Marsupialia were found to share the canopy and to overlap trophically with howling monkeys. These mammals made up 77% and Alouatta 23% of the arboreal mammalian biomass under consideration. The arboreal porcupine and spider monkey were the only mammals that also fed on leaves. However, in this feeding niche, Alouatta is the only important mammalian folivore in Los Tuxtlas, and resource depression derived from leaf-eating insects is more important. The eight arboreal mammals may exert more pressure upon fruit resources, for they consumed 75% of the estimated total dry weight of fruit/ha/yr consumed by arboreal mammals.

Ancillary