Population trends of the mantled howler groups of La Pacifica, Guanacaste, Costa Rica

Authors

  • Margaret R. Clarke,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychology, Loyola University, New Orleans, Louisiana
    • Delta Regional Primate Research Center of Tulane University, Three Rivers Road, Covington, LA 70433
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  • Evan L. Zucker,

    1. Department of Psychology, Loyola University, New Orleans, Louisiana
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  • Norman J. Scott Jr.

    1. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Denver Wildlife Research Center, Museum of Southwestern Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico
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Abstract

A complete survey of La Pacifica in Guanacaste Province, Costa Rica was conducted in July 1984 in order to determine whether the howler (Alouatta palliata) population had declined since 1972 as a result of deforestation. During the 6-day survey, 257 howlers were located, representing 16 different social groupings and nine solitary animals. The total number of howlers, the number and location of groups, and the age-sex composition were very similar to a 1972–1976 survey of the same population. Age-sex composition of La Pacifica howler groups was similar to those of another population of mantled howlers in Costa Rica and of populations in Mexico and in Panama, although La Pacifica had a higher mean number of adult females per group. There was no evidence to support the hypothesis that the La Pacifica howler population has declined in recent times.

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