Territorial shift in the yellow-handed titi monkey (Callicebus torquatus)

Authors

  • Stephen Phillip Easley,

    Corresponding author
    1. Behavioral Medicine Laboratory, Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research, San Antonio, TX
    • Department of Physiology and Medicine, Behavioral Medicine Laboratory, Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research, P.O. Box 28147, San Antonio, TX 78284
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  • Warren G. Kinzey

    1. Department of Anthropology, City College and the Graduate School, The City University of New York, New York
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Abstract

In this study, the ranging pattern of a single group of monogamous and territorial Callicebus torquatus was recorded over a 7-year period from 1974 to 1980. Data on ranging pattern were recorded by direct observation; daily movement patterns were plotted on an accurate, scaled map of the territory. Data were obtained during 1–3-month studies each year from 1974 to 1978 and in 1980, as well as during a 12-month study in 1979-1980. These studies show that the exclusive territory maintained by the group was not spatially stable over the 7-year period. The group gradually moved its territory to the northeast, to the extent that the territory used in 1980 was completely noncoincident with the territory used in 1974 by the same group. Analysis of the ranging pattern from the 12-month study indicates that the group did not exhibit seasonal preferences for different parts of its range. Seasonal ranging patterns, therefore, are not likely to account for the observed territorial shift. It is suggested that territorial shifting may be related to the need for monogamous groups to find new territories for their offspring.

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