Distribution of erythrocytic allozymes in two sibling species of greater galago [Galago crassicaudatus E. Geoffroy 1812 and G. garnettii (Ogilby 1838)]

Authors

  • Judith C. Masters,

    1. Department of Zoology, School of Pathology, South African Institute for Medical Research and University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
    Current affiliation:
    1. Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138
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  • David S. Dunn

    1. MRC Human Ecogenetics Unit, Department of Human Genetics, School of Pathology, South African Institute for Medical Research and University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
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Abstract

This study investigated the use of erythrocyte enzymes as indicators of the presence or absence of gene flow between the sibling species G. crassicaudatus and G. garnettii. Fifty-five animals deriving from 14 different source populations were included in the analyses. In addition to hemoglobin, eight enzyme systems were examined: acid phosphatase, adenylate kinase, carbonic anhydrase II, esterase D, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, peptidase A, and peptidase B. of these, adenylate kinase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, hemoglobin, peptidase A, and peptidase B showed no interspecific or intraspecific variation. Esterase D was polymorphic in certain populations of G. crassicaudatus but not in others or in G. garnettii. Acid phosphatase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase were polymorphic in G. garnettii but monomorphic in all G. crassicaudatus populations. The taxa showed fixation for different alleles at the carbonic anhydrase II locus, indicating a lack of gene exchange between the taxa. We suggest that acid phosphatase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, and carbonic anhydrase II may be used as genetic markers in the identification of these two taxa.

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