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Individuality in male songs of wild black crested Gibbons (Nomascus concolor)

Authors

  • Guo-Zheng Sun,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Genetic Resources and Evolution, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan, China
    2. Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
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  • Bei Huang,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Genetic Resources and Evolution, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan, China
    2. Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
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  • Zhen-Hua Guan,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Genetic Resources and Evolution, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan, China
    2. Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
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  • Thomas Geissmann,

    1. Anthropological Institute, University Zürich-Irchel, Zürich, Switzerland
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  • Xue-Long Jiang

    Corresponding author
    1. State Key Laboratory of Genetic Resources and Evolution, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan, China
    • State Key Laboratory of Genetic Resources and Evolution, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 32 Jiaochang Donglu, Kunming, Yunnan 650223, People's Republic of China
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Abstract

This is the first study of vocal individuality in male songs of black crested gibbons. The sound recordings were carried out at two field sites, Pinghe, Ailao Mountains, and Dazhaizi, Wuliang Mountains, both located in Yunnan province, China. A total of 127 coda phrases of 38 male songs bouts of eight individual male gibbons were analyzed. Stepwise discriminant function analysis was used to examine the acoustic individuality of the males. We found that individuality among neighbors was very pronounced. Moreover, individuality within a site (i.e. among neighbors) is higher than among individuals between sites. Our finding suggests that black crested gibbons may actively increase their degree of vocal individuality against that of their immediate neighbors by vocal adjustment. Am. J. Primatol. 73:431–438, 2011. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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