Get access

Sleeping site selection by proboscis monkeys (Nasalis larvatus) in West Kalimantan, Indonesia

Authors

  • Katie L. Feilen,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Anthropology, University of California, Davis, CA
    • Correspondence to: Katie L. Feilen, Department of Anthropology, University of California-Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616. E-mail: klfeilen@ucdavis.edu

    Search for more papers by this author
  • Andrew J. Marshall

    1. Department of Anthropology, University of California, Davis, CA
    2. Animal Behavior Graduate Group, University of California, Davis, CA
    3. Graduate Group in Ecology, University of California, Davis, CA
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Primates spend at least half their lives sleeping; hence, sleeping site selection can have important effects on behavior and fitness. As proboscis monkeys (Nasalis larvatus) often sleep along rivers and form bands (aggregations of one male groups) at their sleeping sites, understanding sleeping site selection may shed light on two unusual aspects of this species' socioecology: their close association with rivers and their multilevel social organization. We studied sleeping site selection by proboscis monkeys for twelve months at Sungai Tolak, West Kalimantan, Indonesia to test two main hypotheses regarding the drivers of sleeping site selection: reduction of molestation by mosquitoes and anti-predator behavior. We identified to genus and collected data on the physical structure (diameter at breast height, relative height, branch structure, and leaf coverage) of sleeping trees and available trees in three forest types. We used resource selection function models to test specific predictions derived from our two hypotheses. The monkeys preferred to sleep in large trees with few canopy connections located along rivers. The selection of large emergent trees was consistent with both of our main hypotheses: decreased molestation by mosquitoes and reduced potential entry routes for terrestrial predators. Although we are only beginning to understand how sleeping sites might influence behavior, grouping, and potential survival of this species, our study has shown that proboscis monkeys (at Sungai Tolak) have a very strong preference for large trees located near the river. As these trees are often the first to be logged by local villagers, this may exacerbate the problems of forest loss for these endangered monkeys. Am. J. Primatol. 76:1127–1139, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Ancillary