Multivariate dental allometry in primates

Authors

  • Robert S. Corruccini,

    1. Division of Physical Anthropology, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. 20560
    2. Department of Sociology and Anthropology, East Carolina University, Greeneville, North Carolina 27834
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  • Avery M. Henderson

    1. Division of Physical Anthropology, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. 20560
    2. Department of Sociology and Anthropology, East Carolina University, Greeneville, North Carolina 27834
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Abstract

Disagreement is current over the question of whether relatively large teeth in some large primates are a natural outcome of growth trends instead of an indication of intrinsic differences. A cross-primate survey of dental scaling relative to skull (and inferred body) size is given in this study, using a principal component technique to measure the multivariate growth relation between two sets of data: dental size and cranial size. Cheek teeth are strongly positively allometric in restricted taxonomic groups, especially in cercopithecoids. Conversely, the allometry drops to an almost linear proportional growth relation when variation in diet is controlled.

Ancillary