Percentage ash content of nonhuman primate long limb bones

Authors


  • Supported by KUMC Committee on Research Grant 1514.

Abstract

Trotter and Hixon ('76) and Vose and Roach ('72) presented conflicting data about percentage ash content of the long limb bones of M. mulatta and M. nemestrina. The suggestion of Trotter and Hixon ('76) that this discrepancy was due to methods of preparing the bone prior to ashing, rather than to species differences, was tested using data collected by Gong ('72) on the volumetric composition of nonhuman primate bone. Masses of the various chemical fractions of bone reported by Gong ('72) were used to compute ash content as a percentage of total dry weight and ash content as a percentage of fat-free dry weight. Good agreement was found between ash content as a percentage of total dry weight and the data of Vose and Roach ('72); good agreement was also found between ash content as a percentage of fat-free dry weight and the data of Trotter and Hixon ('76). This suggests that the data of Vose and Roach ('72) conflict with those of Trotter and Hixon ('76) because Vose and Roach ('72) failed to defat the bones prior to ashing. No actual species differences exist in the ash content of bones of M. mulatta, and M. nemestrina. The data of Trotter and Hixon ('76) are most likely a more adequate reflection of both the magnitude and the regional similarity of ash content in nonhuman primate bone.

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