The significance of Aleš Hrdlička's “Neanderthal phase of man”: A historical and current assessment

Authors

  • Frank Spencer,

    1. Department of Anthropology, Queens College of the City University of New York, Flushing, New York 11367 (F.S.) and Department of Anthropology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37916 (F.H.S)
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  • Fred H. Smith

    1. Department of Anthropology, Queens College of the City University of New York, Flushing, New York 11367 (F.S.) and Department of Anthropology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37916 (F.H.S)
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Abstract

Aleš Hrdlička's hypothesis on a Neandertal phase of human evolution is examined in light of current data and interpretations on Neandertals. Hrdlička's interpretations are related to his ideas regarding the peopling of the New World. A major early statement of Hrdlička's views on Neandertal was his Huxley Memorial Lecture of 1927. We assess this formulation and subsequent development of his hypothesis. Hrdlička's position is compared with the “presapiens” and “pre-neandertal” hypotheses on the basis of current theory and data.

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