Sexual dimorphism in Laccopithecus robustus, a late Miocene Hominoid from China

Authors

  • Pan Yuerong,

    1. Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology, Beijing, People's Republic of China
    2. Department of Anatomical Sciences, Health Sciences Center, State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York 11794
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  • Diane M. Waddle,

    1. Doctoral Program in Anthropological Sciences, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794
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  • John G. Fleagle

    1. Department of Anatomical Sciences, Health Sciences Center, State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York 11794
    2. Doctoral Program in Anthropological Sciences, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794
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Abstract

Laccopithecus robustus is a siamang-sized fossil ape from the Miocene site of Lufeng, China. The species is known from a partial cranium, numerous mandibles, and scores of isolated teeth. This species shows striking dental similarities to Pliopithecus from the Miocene of Europe and a number of cranial similarities to extant gibbons. Laccopithecus differs from extant gibbons and resembles other fossil and extant apes in showing marked sexual dimorphism in the size and shape of the canines and anterior lower premolars. Evidence for sexual differences in either the size or shape of other teeth is less clear. There is some evidence for a sexual size dimorphism based on the variability of molar teeth.

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