Ohalo II H2: A 19,000-year-old skeleton from a water-logged site at the Sea of Galilee, Israel

Authors

  • I. Hershkovitz Ph.D.,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Anatomy and Anthropology, Sackler Faculty of Medicine Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, 69978, Israel
    2. The Cleveland Museum of Natural History, Cleveland, Ohio 44106
    • Department of Anatomy and Anthropology Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv, Tel Aviv, Israel 69978
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  • M. S. Speirs,

    1. Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Swarthmore College, Swarthmore, Pennsylvania 19081
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  • D. Frayer,

    1. Department of Anthropology, University of Kansas, Kansas 66045
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  • D. Nadel,

    1. Stekelis Museum of Prehistory, Haifa, and The Zinman Institute of Archaeology, University of Haifa, Haifa, 34455, Israel
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  • S. Wish-Baratz,

    1. Department of Anatomy and Anthropology, Sackler Faculty of Medicine Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, 69978, Israel
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  • B. Arensburg

    1. Department of Anatomy and Anthropology, Sackler Faculty of Medicine Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, 69978, Israel
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Abstract

The discovery of well-preserved human remains at the site of Ohalo II in the northern Jordan Valley substantially augments the meager fossil record of the Levantine late Upper Pleistocene. The Ohalo II H2 specimen, dated to ca. 19,000 B.P., is the most complete early Epipaleolithic hominid discovered in Israel and promises to contribute to the clarification of a number of problematic issues in the local evolution of anatomically modern humans. In addition to a description of the burial and its Kebaran context, a detailed anatomical description of the skeleton is offered and morphometric comparisons are made to other Upper Paleolithic hominids. Ohalo II H2 is shown to demonstrate affinities in the craniofacial skeleton to fossils from the early Upper Paleolithic and late Epi-Paleolithic of the Levant. © 1995 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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