Comparative study of the prevalence of maxillary sinusitis in later Medieval urban and rural populations in Northern England

Authors

  • M. E. Lewis,

    1. The Calvin Wells Laboratory, Department of Archaeological Science, University of Bradford, Bradford BD7 1DP, United Kingdom
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  • Dr. C. A. Roberts,

    Corresponding author
    1. The Calvin Wells Laboratory, Department of Archaeological Science, University of Bradford, Bradford BD7 1DP, United Kingdom
    • The Calvin Wells Laboratory, Department of Archaeological Sciences, University of Bradford, Bradford BD7 1DP, UK
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  • K Manchester

    1. The Calvin Wells Laboratory, Department of Archaeological Science, University of Bradford, Bradford BD7 1DP, United Kingdom
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Abstract

Six hundred sixty-three Medieval individuals from Wharram Percy, a rural settlement in the Yorkshire Wolds, and 1,042 individuals from St. Helen-on-the-Walls, a poor parish in the Medieval city of York, were examined in order to test the hypothesis that maxillary sinusitis would be more prevalent in an urban population due to social and environmental conditions characteristic of an industrialized settlement. The results showed that the individuals from St. Helen-on-the-Walls, living in the urban environment, had a greater prevalence of maxillary sinusitis than the rural population; 39% (106) of the individuals from Wharram Percy had evidence of sinusitis compared to 55% (134) of the individuals from St. Helen-on-the-Walls. It is suggested that this pattern may be attributed to occupation and industrial air pollution in the Medieval city of York. © 1995 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Ancillary