Some observations on enamel thickness and enamel prism packing in the miocene hominoid Otavipithecus namibiensis

Authors

  • Dr. Glenn C. Conroy,

    Corresponding author
    1. Departments of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Washington University Medical School, St. Louis, Missouri 63110
    2. Department of Anthropology, Washington University Medical School, St. Louis, Missouri 63110
    • Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology. Washington University School of Medicine, Box 8108, St. Louis, MO 63110
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  • Jeff W. Lichtman,

    1. Departments of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Washington University Medical School, St. Louis, Missouri 63110
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  • Lawrence B. Martin

    1. Departments of Anthropology and of Anatomical Sciences, SUNY at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794
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Abstract

Otavipithecus namibiensis is currently the sole representative of a Miocene hominoid radiation in subequatorial Africa. Several nondestructive techniques, such as computed tomography (CT) and confocal microscopy (CFM), can provide useful information about dental characteristics in this southern African Miocene hominoid. Our studies suggest that the molars of Otavipithecus are characterized by (1) thin enamel and (2) a predominance of pattern 1 enamel prism. Together, these findings provide little support for the recent suggestion of an Afropithecini clade consisting of Otavipithecus, Heliopithecus, and Afropithecus. Instead, they lend some (though not conclusive) support to the suggestion of an Otavipithecus/African ape clade distinct from Afropithecus. © 1995 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Ancillary