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A new model for collection of clinical outcomes data in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis

Authors

  • Josh C. Meier MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Otolaryngology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, MA
    2. Department of Otology and Laryngology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
    • Correspondence to: Josh C. Meier, MD, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, 243 Charles Street, Boston, MA 02114; e-mail: josh_meier@meei.harvard.edu

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  • Aaron K. Remenschneider MD, MPH,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, MA
    2. Department of Otology and Laryngology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
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  • Laura D'Amico BA,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, MA
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  • Eric H. Holbrook MD,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, MA
    2. Department of Otology and Laryngology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
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  • Stacey T. Gray MD,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, MA
    2. Department of Otology and Laryngology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
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  • Ralph Metson MD

    1. Department of Otolaryngology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, MA
    2. Department of Otology and Laryngology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
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  • Funding sources for the study: Committee on Quality of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, MA.

  • Potential conflict of interest: None provided.

  • Presented orally at the 59th Annual American Rhinologic Society (ARS) Meeting on September 28, 2013, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Abstract

Background

The need for objective assessment of patient outcomes is becoming an essential component of clinical practice for both private and academic otolaryngologists. The purpose of this study is to describe the implementation of an online model for collection of clinical outcomes data in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS).

Methods

Patients completed the Sinonasal Outcome Test (SNOT-22), Chronic Sinusitis Survey (CSS), and EuroQol 5-dimension assessment (EQ-5D), before and after sinus surgery. One year after initial patient enrollment, an online tool was developed to facilitate collection of postoperative data. Response rates preimplementation and postimplementation of online data collection were compared.

Results

A total of 520 sinus surgery patients provided outcomes data from the practices of 7 private practice (n = 308) and 4 academic otolaryngologists (n = 212). With implementation of the online collection instrument, the response rate at 3 months increased from 67% to 78.8% (p = 0.004). The overall follow-up rate at 3 months was higher in patients recruited from private as compared to academic practices (77.9% vs 69.8%, respectively, p = 0.04).

Conclusion

Quality of life data can be effectively collected from CRS patients in both the private and academic practice setting. The addition of an online data collection tool can significantly increase response rates, and allow a comprehensive capture of meaningful clinical outcomes. Such a model is not difficult to implement and has increasing relevance as payers begin to request outcome data from providers.

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