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Parental smoking and allergic rhinitis in children

Authors

  • Maryam Salehi MD,

    1. Immunology Research Center, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences and Assistant Professor of Community Medicine, Community Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, Mashhad, Iran
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  • Mehdi Bakhshaee MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Sinus and Surgical Endoscopic Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
    • Correspondence to: Mehdi Bakhshaee, MD, Associate professor of the Sinus and Surgical Endoscopic Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran; e-mail: mehbakhsh@yahoo.com

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  • Sara Jafari Ashtiani MD,

    1. Sinus and Surgical Endoscopic Research Center, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
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  • Mona Najafi MD,

    1. Department of Community Medicine, School of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
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  • Samineh Sehatbakhsh MD,

    1. Sinus and Surgical Endoscopic Research Center, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
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  • Mana Hossainzadeh MD

    1. Sinus and Surgical Endoscopic Research Center, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
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  • Potential conflict of interest: None provided.

Abstract

Background

Parental smoking is one of the controversial risk factors associated with allergic rhinitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between parental smoking and allergic rhinitis; considering confounding factors.

Methods

A cross-sectional study was conducted on 671 children aged 2 to 7 years. Random cluster sampling was used to select the participants. The signs and symptoms of allergic rhinitis in children were assessed through standard questionnaires and physical examinations.

Results

In the multivariate analysis, parental smoking (odds ratio [OR] 1.07; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.48–2.41) was not a significant risk factor for allergic rhinitis; positive family history of allergy was the only significant factor among other factors (OR 23.64; 95% CI, 11.63–48.04). Sex (OR 1.16; 95% CI, 0.60–2.24), family size (OR 1.06; 95% CI, 0.22–5.05), family income (OR 0.60; 95% CI, 0.24–1.47), and parents’ education (OR 1.79; 95% CI, 0.61–5.20) were not statistically significant.

Conclusion

The findings suggest that there is no significant relationship between parental smoking and allergic rhinitis.

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