Genetic and environmental factors in the cause of Parkinson's disease

Authors

  • Thomas T. Warner PhD, FRCP,

    1. Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Royal Free and University College Medical School, London NW3 2PF, United Kingdom
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  • Anthony H. V. Schapira MD, FRCP, FMedSci

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Royal Free and University College Medical School, London NW3 2PF, United Kingdom
    • Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Royal Free and University College Medical School, Rowland Hill Street, London NW3 2PF, United Kingdom
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Abstract

Despite being the subject of intense study, the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease still remains unclear. In recent years, however, there has been increasing evidence to support a role for genetic factors in its cause. This has come from twin and family studies, the mapping and cloning of PARK genes that are associated with the development of PD, and analysis of potential susceptibility genes. There is also evidence indicating that environmental factors may play a role in the disease process. It is likely that for most cases, there is a complex interplay between these genetic and environmental influences in the causation of Parkinson's disease. This article reviews the evidence in support of genetic and environmental factors in the cause of PD. Ann Neurol 2003;53 (suppl 3):S16–S25

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