Functional magnetic resonance imaging of human absence seizures

Authors

  • Afraim Salek-Haddadi MRCP,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Clinical and Experimental Epilepsy, Institute of Neurology, University College London, London
    2. MRI Unit, National Society for Epilepsy, Buckinghamshire
    • MRI Unit, National Society for Epilepsy, Chalfont St. Peter, Buckinghamshire SL9 0RJ, United Kingdom
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  • Louis Lemieux PhD,

    1. Department of Clinical and Experimental Epilepsy, Institute of Neurology, University College London, London
    2. MRI Unit, National Society for Epilepsy, Buckinghamshire
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  • Martin Merschhemke MD,

    1. Department of Clinical and Experimental Epilepsy, Institute of Neurology, University College London, London
    2. MRI Unit, National Society for Epilepsy, Buckinghamshire
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  • Karl J. Friston FMedSci,

    1. Wellcome Department of Imaging Neuroscience, Institute of Neurology, University College London
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  • John S. Duncan DM,

    1. Department of Clinical and Experimental Epilepsy, Institute of Neurology, University College London, London
    2. MRI Unit, National Society for Epilepsy, Buckinghamshire
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  • David R. Fish FRCP

    1. Department of Clinical and Experimental Epilepsy, Institute of Neurology, University College London, London
    2. MRI Unit, National Society for Epilepsy, Buckinghamshire
    3. Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London, United Kingdom
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Abstract

We studied a patient with idiopathic generalized epilepsy and frequent absences, using electroencephalogram-correlated functional magnetic resonance imaging. Four prolonged runs of generalized spike-wave discharge occurred during a 35-minute experiment. Time-locked activation was observed bilaterally within the thalami in conjunction with widespread but symmetrical cortical deactivation with a frontal maximum. We demonstrate the reciprocal participation of focal thalamic and widespread cortical networks during human absence seizures and suggest reductions in cortical blood flow, in response to synchronized electroencephalogram activity. Ann Neurol 2003;53:663–667

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